Monthly Archives: February 2010

Two months with eagle eye vision

American Bald Eagle Close-up Portrait by Beverly & Pack / CC BY 2.0

It’s been two months now since I had my EPI-LASIK surgery and I have to say I’m extremely happy with the result. I’m beginning to see things clearly now and have a different perspective on things!

EPI-LASIK isn’t like the traditional LASIK where they cut a slit in your cornea and operate with laser behind the lid. Instead, EPI-LASIK operates straight on the surface of the eye. This means that it’s much safer (no need to cut in the eye!), and as a result, you don’t risk cutting the nerves that control eye fluids, something which tends to make LASIK patients suffer from dry eyes. More info about EPI-LASIK can be found here (warning: marketing material).

To anyone who is considering going through this procedure, here’s a bit of info on how it works and what to expect:

  • The actual surgery was completely painless and not at all as scary as I thought. The machine handled everything itself, and the only thing the doctor actually did was dropping cooling and disinfecting drops into the eyes before and after the laser did its job.
  • After the laser was done, they put a protective contact lens on the eye. Immediately after the surgery, I could see much better than I could without glasses before.
  • About 20 minutes after the surgery, the eyes started to itch and I became sensitive to light.
  • The following 48 hours were pretty tough with tears running down my cheeks, extreme light sensitivity and itching/painful eyes. I spent most of the time just lying in bed listening to music with my eyes shut. (Christina Aguilera’s Hurt was played more often that I would like to admit; maybe my state of mind made me more receptive to emotional lyrics?)
  • After these 48 hours, I woke up with essentially no pain at all. It felt a bit like wearing contact lenses for too many hours, which of course was exactly the case too, since I had to wear the protective contact lens for about five days.
  • I was still sensitive to light during the third day, but on day four it was all gone.
  • After five days (the day before Christmas Eve), I visited the optician again and could finally remove the protective contact lens. From there on, it was as if the surgery never happened!

This is easily the best investment I’ve ever done to myself (aside from making Sofie my girlfriend). So far, the vision hasn’t really stabilized, and some days my left eye is better than the right, and then the next day it has changed. I still don’t see perfectly, but it’s good enough that I almost never think about it. If Ken pushed me to give a number, I’d say my vision is at 97% right now.

According to the doctor, the healing process can take up to a whole year, so it’s too early to tell what the end result will be — we will see! But even if it doesn’t get any better than this, it’s still better than I had with contact lenses, and without the dry eyes and hassle of taking them in and out of your eyes every day.

See you later!

Nokia N900 impressions

I’ve been using the Nokia N900 for a couple of weeks now and I have both good and bad things to say about it. To give you an idea of what I’m comparing with, my previous phone was a Nokia N95. Here’s my list of impressions:

Pros

  • The screen is pretty good, and I rarely have a problem clicking on links and buttons using my thumbs. The fact that it’s resistive feels like an advantage in this incredibly cold Swedish winter. Next to a Nexus One, however, it’s obvious that the color reproduction could be better.
  • The Mozilla-based MicroB browser really is awesome. Scrolling and zooming is so smooth and quick that it feels like surfing on the iPhone, only this time you’re using the real web. By far the best web browsing experience I’ve had on a mobile device.
  • The fact that I can use it to call VoIP, Skype, Gtalk, and regular cellular networks is amazing.
  • The Conversations application seamlessly integrates IM and SMS in an intuitive manner.
  • The media player handles almost anything you throw at it after installing a few extra software packages.
  • Great synchronization with Exchange-based mail services (e.g. Zimbra, which Mozilla uses).
  • Nice multiple desktop solution (though lacks useful widgets).
  • Battery life is impressive in active use such as in a phone call. Though see the standby time below…
  • The “one-click” (actually a few clicks) publishing of both photos and videos to services like Facebook and Flickr is really neat. Though see below about the camera quality…
  • It really is fun to use it. And it’s open source! And it can run Firefox!

Cons

  • This thing is heavy! I thought my N95 was heavy, but this is significantly heavier. It definitely feels like a solid device, for better or worse.
  • The camera is actually worse than the 3-year-old N95 camera in a number of ways: terrible colors in low light, terrible metering, light leaks making the subject in focus appear washed out, and the field of view is narrower than the N95 camera. In comparison, here’s a photo taken by the N95. Both are 5-megapixel cameras.
  • The standby time is a joke. I don’t know what I’m doing wrong, but sometimes I can just keep the phone in my pocket during the whole day and it will discharge in less than 8 hours. I first kept all accounts logged in (Skype, VoIP, Jabber), but have since then compromised a bit and only keep Jabber online. Still, the battery isn’t impressive.
  • The horizontal layout is annoying most of the time. When I’m out and about, it feels awkward that I can’t use the phone with one hand. I understand the “handheld computer” legacy (I even owned an N810), but feel that my typical use is much more like a regular smartphone than a portable computer. Ideally, all applications should support both layouts.
  • The keyboard, while certainly better than the N810, is still not really good. It’s too easy to click on the wrong keys, and there’s no auto complete feature that can detect (and correct) common spelling mistakes.
  • The auto suggest feature only shows one suggestion, so 90% of the time it’s not suggesting the word you want and as a result you end up ignoring the suggestions altogether.
  • The physical unlock switch is only comfortable to use when in horizontal layout. It’s nearly impossible to reach with one hand if you just want to make a quick call.

djst's nest, a microblog?

I’m thinking of turning this blog into a microblog. What that actually means is simply that I would write more often on the blog without feeling that every blog post needs to be substantial, clever, and proof-read.

I’ve found that I blog much less nowadays and the main reason for it is a lack of time — it’s so much simpler to just post a Facebook status update, or tweet. But at the same time, I often feel that I could write at least a few sentences about any given topic, which immediately makes the 140 character limit somewhat… limiting.

In the Mozilla world, I recently worked in the Paris office for a week, interviewed some really strong candidates for the Support Community Manager role, hung out with my Mozilla community friends at FOSDEM 2010, and sang songs about nukeador — all of which are topics worthy of (micro)blog posts on their own.

So, rather than letting this blog slowly die, I will start to write briefer blog posts and get them out more frequently. Consider this my Sunday morning promise (whatever that means).