Tag Archives: open source

Firefox is freedom

Love this quote:

I honestly believe Mozilla is committed to freedom and privacy on the web. Google is committed to making money and knowing everything I do. Firefox greets me with a page explaining my rights as a user of open source software. Chrome greets me with… sigh… Chrome greets me with a fucking advertisement for a Chromebook.

Cameron Paul on Why I’m Switching (Back) to Firefox

If you’re running Windows, Mac, Linux and haven’t used Firefox for a while, it’s time to switch back. And if you have an Android-powered phone, you definitely should check out the best mobile browser, bar none: Firefox for Android.

Firefox for Android finally ready for prime time!

If you’ve tried Firefox for Android in the past and weren’t impressed, try again today. With a revamped interface built entire from scratch, it’s infinitely faster, renders websites beautifully, and supports Flash (for those who happen to like that).

Promotional Graphic (2)

Sync your mobile and desktop Firefox

If you’re using Firefox on your desktop computer, the first thing you will want to do is to set up Sync so you can synchronize bookmarks, passwords, form data and other settings across your devices. Simply follow the on-screen instructions or check out this step-by-step guide.

Already hungry for more? Get Aurora!

What if you’re already using Firefox and want to get a sneak peek at what’s coming up in the future? Then install Firefox Aurora and use that instead of plain Firefox! Aurora is an experimental branch of Firefox that represents what will eventually appear in a future Firefox release. So by using Aurora, you get to see what awesome things are coming up before mere mortals will benefit from them. They’re generally stable enough that you can use it without any major issues. Besides, if something does go wrong, you can always just switch back to normal Firefox again — you can keep both versions installed on both your computer and phone (though you can’t run them both at the same time, so Quit one before starting the other).

Keep in mind that by using Aurora, you are also encouraged to provide feedback about the experience. If you’re a bit more technical and used to filing bug reports, you can go straight to Bugzilla and submit your feedback that way.

I love the iPad!

Mmm, the iPad. It’s so beautiful, so sleek, so elegant, so useful. I think everyone should buy one. A couple of things I love about it:

1. Seal of Quality

Isn’t it great that Apple reviews all programs before they’re added to the App Store? It’s a bit like the Seal of Quality™ stamp that good old Nintendo put on their NES games to ensure you that your purchase would give you hours of quality game play in front of the television set make more money.

In practice, this means that we can feel safe with our iPads knowing that the virtual chocolate box app we purchase meets Apples’ rigorous quality standards. And it’s only $0.99! That’s almost free as in beer, folks (who cares about free as in speech anyway?).

2. Browser Choice

We all know how important the web browser choice is. That’s why it’s so convenient that Apple already made the choice for us on the iPad: Safari! They even went the extra mile to make it impossible to install other browsers, so I don’t need to worry about whether or not Safari is the right choice for me.  And besides, Safari is the best browser out there, right?

Or as they say themselves:

“Our lives are full of choices. iPod Touch or iPod Nano? Silver, Pink, Orange, Green, Blue, Purple or Black? All of them?

As a for-profit corporation, we have always believed that the freedom to make smart choices should be restricted to Apple to make the product experience, the Web, and the world, a better place. This shows through with our iPad running Safari, a free-as-in-beer, closed-source Web browser that we have chosen for more than 350 people in the US. Values of choice and self-determination are built into everything that we do: you can either buy the iPad, or don’t. You know you want to.”

Nothing to see here, please move along

I regard myself as geeky enough that I should be able to solve computer problems myself, or at least with the help of some self-service online searching. However, there are times when I simply can’t figure it out. I don’t know if I’m slowly getting dumber as I’m getting older, or if I’m just getting used to the ever-improving user experience in modern software (after all, I spend about 80% of my time in front of the computer using Firefox). Or maybe certain software is just particularly unhelpful?

Whatever the reason, I obviously care a lot about user support, and use all the opportunities I can get to explore how other products/projects handle support. Also, I’m genuinely interested in user experience design, so I thought I should share this combined support/UX problem, not just as a self-centered way to ask for support, but because the subject genuinely interests me.

My morning greeting from Colloquy the last 12 months or so.

The problem I have is with the IRC client for Mac called Colloquy. Every time I start the program, it pops up a notification saying “You have 1 new memo.” Clicking on this notification does nothing (other than closing the notification itself) and I have searched through all menu items trying to find a place where I can actually read this memo. So far I have failed, and today I thought I should do some searching to find the answer online.

I started by searching in the Help menu and selected Colloquy Help, which took me to their Wiki documentation site. A search for “memo” there mostly resulted in articles about memory leaks, so I performed both generic and specific searches on Google instead.

A search for “reading memos colloquy mac” finally revealed the solution: the notification about 1 new memo is actually coming from the message server of irc.mozilla.org, not from Colloquy itself! After some experiments, I finally figured our how to read it.

To read my memo, I had to type, in irc.mozilla.org:

    /msg memoserv read 1

And to remove it, I had to type:

    /msg memoserv del 1

The conclusion? IRC is not for mainstream users.

Sorry for wasting your time by stating the obvious like this!